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More info on Napier wānanga

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The Tikanga and Law wānanga to be held at Pukemokimoki marae in Napier on 12 November is just under one week away.

If you are interested in attending, please register here so that I can get a more accurate idea of numbers for catering purposes.

The proposed agenda for the wānanga is available here: tikanga-and-law_napier_12nov2016.

Please also note the participant information sheet (mlt_infosheet) and consent form (mlt_consentform).

I will talk through the information sheet and consent form at the beginning of the wānanga on Saturday and can answer any questions anyone has about these. The purpose of gaining formal consent is to ensure that everyone is comfortable with parts of the wānanga being filmed and understand that any information discussed at the wānanga is provided on terms that they are happy with e.g. people do not need to be identified in any notes if they do not want to be.

Please let me know if you have any questions about any of this. I can be contacted at carwyn.jones@vuw.ac.nz

Looking forward to the discussion on Saturday!

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More information about Wairoa wānanga

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The Tikanga and Law wānanga to be held at Taihoa marae in Wairoa on 15 October is just under one week away.

If you are interested in attending, please register here so that I can get a more accurate idea of numbers for catering purposes.

The proposed agenda for the wānanga is available here: tikanga-and-law_wairoa_15oct2016.

Please also note the participant information sheet (mlt_infosheet) and consent form (mlt_consentform).

I will talk through the information sheet and consent form at the beginning of the wānanga on Saturday and can answer any questions anyone has about these. The purpose of gaining formal consent is to ensure that everyone is comfortable with parts of the wānanga being filmed and understand that any information discussed at the wānanga is provided on terms that they are happy with e.g. people do not need to be identified in any notes if they do not want to be.

Please let me know if you have any questions about any of this. I can be contacted at carwyn.jones@vuw.ac.nz

Looking forward to the discussion on Saturday!

Tikanga & Law wānanga – Wairoa, 15 Oct

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On Saturday 15 October 2016, I’ll be facilitating a wānanga on Tikanga and Law at Taihoa marae in Wairoa. This wānanga will look at some Ngāti Kahungunu stories to see where, in these stories, we can identify law – how are rights and obligations allocated? how are these enforced? who has authority to make decisions? what factors are taken into account?

The aim is to explore ways of strengthening Māori law and think about how we can use tikanga to resolve legal issues that our communities are dealing with.

See the pānui at the link below for more details and please register for free here if you would like to attend.

Pānui for Tikanga & Law wānanga, Wairoa, 15 October 2016: tikangalaw_wairoa

Summary of the project

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The state legal system recognises some aspects of tikanga Māori as customary law. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition by legal academics and practitioners that Māori law is not limited to those practices that the state legal system incorporates. Māori legal traditions exist as part of a distinct Māori legal system. This project aims to build on that foundation but also represents an important shift from the existing literature. The objective is to develop an internal perspective of Māori law, exploring the overarching framework by interrogating specific instances and practices of Māori law-making and dispute resolution.

 This project seeks to understand Māori legal traditions on their own terms, rather than through the lens of the state legal system and will focus on identifying Māori legal reasoning from within traditional Māori stories. The project will develop a case-analysis framework that is specifically tailored to Māori legal traditions. This project has the potential to radically increase the accessibility of Māori law in a way that not only empowers Māori communities but also enables the state legal system to engage with Māori legal issues with a significantly greater degree of sophistication than is currently the case.